Sunday 31st May 2020

Focus on Medicine

Careers in medicine were the latest focus in a series of talks to students from Y9 to13. Guests this morning were Bruce Pennie, Consultant Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgeon at University Hospitals Aintree and two former students, Josh Topping and Dylan Griffiths, who are studying medicine at Leeds and Liverpool universities respectively.

Dr Pennie, whose two sons were pupils at St Margaret’s, explained the pitfalls and the benefits of a career in medicine. “The pay is good and it is a job that carries a lot of kudos, he said, but it is not for the squeamish.” A series of slides he showed from a night in A and E certainly illustrated that, with medics dealing with anything from severed limbs to difficult drunks.

He also emphasised the difficulties in obtaining a place at Medical School. There are 33 medical schools up and down the country, offering 8,000 - 9,000 places.  In reality there are 21,000 students competing for those places. “Being a Doctor is not difficult, he said, getting into Medical School is”

Typical entry requirements include achieving 3 AAB grades at A’ level, including Chemistry and Biology, plus a good clutch of GCSE’s, with courses lasting five years.

Volunteering has featured in all the Careers talks we have had so far. Josh advised the students to do as many volunteering activities as possible to impress potential Universities. The more volunteering projects you get involved with the better. If you don’t do these things, then you won’t get in” he said.


Careers in medicine were the latest focus in a series of talks to students from Y9 to13. Guests in the last week of term were Bruce Pennie, Consultant Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgeon at University Hospitals Aintree and two former students, Josh Topping and Dylan Griffiths, who are studying medicine at the University of Leeds and Liverpool respectively.

Dr Pennie, whose two sons were pupils at St Margaret’s, explained the pitfalls and the benefits of a career in medicine. “The pay is good and it is a job that carries a lot of kudos, he said, but it is not for the squeamish.” A series of slides he showed from a night in A and E certainly illustrated that, with medics dealing with anything from severed limbs to difficult drunks.

He also emphasised the difficulties in obtaining a place at Medical School. There are 33 medical schools up and down the country, offering 8,000- 9,000 places. In reality there are 21,000 students competing for those places. “Being a Doctor is not difficult, he said, getting into Medical School is”

Typical entry requirements include achieving 3 AAB grades at A’ level, including Chemistry and Biology, plus a good clutch of GCSE’s, with courses lasting five years.

Volunteering has featured in all the Careers talks we have had so far. Josh advised the students to do as many volunteering activities as possible to impress potential Universities. The more volunteering projects you get involved with the better. If you don’t do these things, then you won’t get in” he said.

“Eggs”ellent Prize

Well done to Tony in Year 8 on winning £250 for the school and a prize for himself. You can see his prizewinning entry here.